Category Archives: Philippines

SURVEY: Elitism in the Philippines

Message to all the followers and fans:

I sincerely apologize for the long hiatus without even posting a hiatus post (OMG, this is the worst mortal sin I have committed). Anyways, I am now writing a book (I am doing my best to make this shit serious, I am not kidding this time!) about Elitism in the Philippines since its title will be, “Elitism in the Orient Pearl.”

PS: I am making a career out of it, so better bear with me regarding this one.

Intro Speech

If you are a Filipino residing in the Philippines or abroad (or if you’re a foreigner who naturalized as a Filipino citizen), feel free to answer this survey I am conducting online if you are willing to help me finish this book without any qualms. This is the only way for me to receive true feedback from netizens residing in the Philippines and/or abroad.

Survey Proper

SURVEY #1 – Introduction
SURVEY #2 – Sample Excerpts

To all the haters, bashers and the like:

Guys, do not misinterpret this one as attention-whoring. I know some of you (who are elitists) who will make an issue out of this post. Remember, I am writing a book, not creating some controversy or spark any issue that will hurt innocent people out of your intentional mishaps (lol). Just don’t answer the survey or buy the book (coming soon) if you don’t have any interest in doing so. My aim is to educate a lot of people who do not have access to social media, and I am making the price of this book as cheap as I could assign the price. Soon, I will come back to Photoshop or prolly have a new iPad mini (hopefully the iPad mini 3) with me, and there’s nothing you can really do with it if you think I am very harsh on my upcoming book haha.

Ending Note

No one can ever stop me from writing my first book. Just stay tuned for more updates!

Best and Worst Passports to Have

Best Passports   Worst Passports

It is not surprising that Germany, Japan and of course the United States would be on the top list.

Sadly, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Australia, Brunei and Malaysia didn’t make it to the top 20 best passports list, but that’s alright, for as long as they could access at least Canada, NZ, UK and the Schengen Area without visa restrictions.

No passport is perfect, since countries like Japan and the United States have burdens to get a visa to Brazil or even Russia, which is actually something that South Korean passports are blessed with: Visa-free travel to Russia and Brazil.

But then again, why is South Korea not even on the Top 20 list?

Hmmm… I don’t think pre-arrival visa to China should be a hindrance, but I think Koreans from the ROK are very lucky to have a passport that could send them to a lot of countries without a visa. Also, they’re part of the visa waiver to Australia and the United States, therefore it shouldn’t be a problem at all.

Also, South Korea finally allowed multiple citizenship… but quota-based. However, they should adopt the “Ritenshon Shonin” in order for everyone to still have Korean citizenship in all aspects (so to speak, native South Koreans could still have Korean citizenship and American citizenship if they’re born in the US, and Koreans who were born in South Korea but naturalized in another country could still retain their Korean citizenship, and half-Koreans who are dual citizens since birth could still retain their citizenship no matter the cost will be–for as long as they’ll apply for permission to retain their Korean citizenship).

Also, if you’re a South Korean citizen, you could go to South America visa-free/visa-on-arrival, which American and Japanese passport holders don’t have (they both need visa to enter Brazil in advance).

Well, the only downside is that, South Korean passport holders cannot enter North Korea at all, since both countries are still enemies. South Koreans don’t really like going to North Korea at all, and they’re fine with it–as a matter of fact, many North Koreans who escape their own country fly to South Korea for good. Obviously, South Korea offers greener pastures and better quality of life, as opposed to North Korea.

By essence, South Korea officially recognizes North Koreans as South Korean citizens. If North Koreans escape from their home country successfully via the indirect route, this means that they become South Koreans for good. It’s a good thing that the ROK government resurrected its peace talk plans towards North Korea.

South Korea not making it to the top list… why?

South Korea is actually a latecomer when it comes to being one of the richest and the most developed countries in the world. It is one of the Asian Tigers, alongside Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore. Well, these Asian Tigers of course, has this freedom to travel without a visa. I really dunno why Brunei isn’t included in the Asian Tigers to make it five… hmmm…

Well, I just hope that South Korea will still develop its bilateral relations with other states so that South Koreans would travel up to 170+ countries without a visa. Speaking of which, it is possible that South Korea might as well continue its peace talks with North Korea so that South Korean citizens won’t feel tension with its rival state.

Other countries with travel freedom (but did not make it on the top list)

Australia, Greece and Iceland are the Western countries (though Australia is geographically a South-east country with a Westernized culture) that didn’t make it to the top list. It is surprising for Australia since its neighbor New Zealand surpassed it by making it to the Top 20. Other countries like what I have mentioned before (Malaysia, South Korea, Brunei, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore) also have this travel freedom reward.

To make the list… (check this list out if you want)

[Just remember, they’re not actually in order… hehehe]

1.) Liechtenstein – It didn’t make to the top list, but it still had the 100+ visa-free access.
2.) Israel – Though the Arab League is technically an avid “hater” of this country, this country rather is more rewarded than the Arab League states, in terms of travel freedom–it can access Japan, South Korea and the Schengen Area
3.) Mauritius – Surprisingly, this little island country in the southern part of Africa within the Indian Ocean allows its citizens to travel to the Schengen Area and Japan without a visa.
4.) Barbados – Same with Mauritius.
5.) Mexico – Same with Mauritius and Barbados, but what these three have in common is that their passports aren’t biometric (AWWWWWW…).
6.) Brazil – Though Brazilians need to enter Japan with a visa in advance, it could enter the Schengen area without a visa.
7.) Argentina – Same with Brazil, but its citizens could enter Japan without a visa.
8.) Chile – Same with Argentina, I think.
9.) Czech Republic – Of course, it’s part of the Schengen Area.
10.) Cyprus – Cyprus is fairly European, so to speak. And YES, it’s part of the EU.

So far, I base these things on how they could access the following territories (not necessarily ALL of them):

1.) European Union and the Schengen Area – Of course, to be fair this will include the United Kingdom and Ireland, and also non-EU member states such as Norway, Iceland and Switzerland (EFTA members, if not EU, lol). Eastern Europe is included if you’re talking about EU member states haha.
2.) South America – Visa-free access to South America is actually not-so bad after all, but once a country is rewarded visa-free access to ALL South American countries without a visa, this would mean that they have the same level as the Pope (well, almost).
3.) OECD member states (namely Japan and Israel) – If you’re one of the countries that could enter Japan and Israel without a visa (all of them), then you must be lucky.
4.) Countries with the most lenient visa policies (Philippines, Ecuador, Malaysia, Haiti, South Korea) – Well, Haiti seems to have the most lenient visa policy in the world, which will put Ecuador second to the list, and I’ll make a separate article about this one). Meanwhile, South Korea has eased their visa policies towards other countries (the Philippines is NOT lucky to be one of the countries that could access South Korea without a tourist visa, prolly due to the “Tago ng Tago/TNT” controversy–but when it comes to Israel, Filipino citizens could enter Israel without a visa at all), but there are some countries that need a visa to enter the Land of the Morning Calm.
5.) South Africa (and the rest of its neighbors) and the United Arab Emirates – Same thing with #3. No need to explain further.

Well, access to Vietnam, China, North America and Russia aren’t counted at all since it would be unfair to some countries included in the list. Remember, it’s actually very difficult to get a visa going to Vietnam (sources say), China (it’s easier getting a Chinese visa if you’re a Filipino citizen and China only allows 6 countries to enter its territory without a visa), North America (some countries need to access Canada with a visa, except if you’re coming from the EU/Schengen Area or a developed country in general; and the United States’s visa policies are much stricter compared to China) and Russia (ahhh… sources say it’s very difficult to obtain a Russian visa, but it still depends upon the country you’re coming from).

Worst Passports: Why Worst!?

It’s actually FAIR and JUST that China did not make it to the Top 20 WORST Passports list, even though it’s quite infuriating to possess a Chinese passport (just ask those Filipino-Chinese friends of yours who are not yet officially Filipino citizens, or their parents who are not yet Filipino citizens)–well, the reason why I’m saying this is because China, even though its citizens need to apply for visa to Ecuador and the Philippines, did not make it to the top 20 worst passports list is because at least it still has the “worth” in it. However, what makes it something not to be proud of is the controversial inclusion of its “disputed” territories which is of course possessions of Vietnam, Philippines and India. Also, China isn’t having a formal war with the United States compared to most Arab and Muslim states such as Afghanistan, Iraq… and you know the rest.

These countries actually restrict foreigners from entering their territories without a visa mainly because of the war that’s happening in their territory. I bet, countries that are actually having internal conflict cannot actually concentrate on bilateral agreements due to the fact that unending wars are still on-going. No wonder, South Korea actually didn’t allow its own citizens to enter these countries. The Philippines actually did this as well, to Filipinos who actually want to enter Iraq despite its status.

Well, these countries are actually having wars and conflicts, therefore the result: They can only access no more than 41 countries without a visa, which is actually more infuriating compared to possessing a Chinese passport.

Why is China not included in the list!?

I hate to say this, but even though China did not make it to the top list, other countries impose visa towards China is because there are a lot of illegal immigrants from China, despite its growing economy. Ecuador and the Philippines are imposing visas towards Chinese citizens due to the fact that everywhere, you see a Chinese person. Prolly at the end of the day, Filipinos might be the second largest ethnic diaspora next to China, or even surpassing them (unless the 1987 Constitution is burned to the pits of hell, haha).

Also, China imposes visa to other countries, which is actually more frustrating. Only six countries could enter China without a visa (Brunei, Japan, Singapore and Mauritius), but Wikipedia stated seven countries (Gawd, when will I stop relying too much on Wikipedia!?). Only diplomatic and official passport holders have the privilege to enter China without a visa, which is again, frustrating for ordinary passport holders.

Indicators of having a “good ordinary passport”:

1.) If a certain country has good diplomatic relations with other countries.
2.) Lesser numbers of an ethnic diaspora.
3.) Less people who overstay.
4.) Less people who stay illegally in a foreign country.
5.) Countries that have no internal conflict.

I actually do not buy the fact that the smaller and the richer the country, the more you could travel without a visa. Well, Barbados and Mauritius might not be as rich as the OECD founding members, but speaking of internal events in a country, it should be something that adheres with international standards.

What makes a good passport?

Visa requirements for British citizens

Visa requirements for Japanese citizens

Visa requirements for U.S. American citizens

Visa requirements for South Korean citizens

I have noticed that if you come from a developed country, you usually get lots of benefits if you are a citizen of the countries I have mentioned above. However, being a rich/not-so-rich but not-too-poor country doesn’t really mean you could already travel without any visa. I’ll show you more examples:

Visa requirements for Filipino citizens

Side Note: Even though South Korea has a lenient visa policy, the Philippines, however, isn’t included in its list in the countries that do not need visa to enter its territory without the visa, probably due to Filipinos “overstaying.” After all, I still consider a trip to South Korea a privilege.

And here’s the worst part…

Visa requirements for Chinese (mainland) citizens

This map shows that owning a Vietnamese or Iranian passport is even more valuable than owning a Chinese passport (most countries offer visa-on-arrival travel for Chinese citizens, only a few are willing to offer totally visa-free travel for Chinese citizens). Ah, the horrors of having 1 billion people residing in one big country… and overseas. But don’t worry, the mainland Chinese government is doing efforts to sign mutual visa-free agreement with other countries. Well, Filipino government officials should warn China that it should stop bullying the Philippines so that Chinese citizens could travel to the Philippines without any visa… like let’s say, for 14 days only.

Here, even though China is wealthier than the Philippines, Filipino citizens (like me) could travel without any visa in 58 countries. In the Philippines, you need to get a visa before travelling to other countries such as Japan, the US, China, Australia and of course, South Korea. As a matter of fact, only the privileged ones could afford getting visas.

Diplomatic Relations Matter

Visa requirements for Israeli citizens

If you happen to be an Israeli citizen… I have to warn you guys that there are some countries that despise your country. Hmmm… well, not saying that it is oppressive to be an Israeli citizen, but other countries view it as “occupied Palestine” since these countries that have an obsessive form of hate towards Israel are mostly pro-Palestine. It’s not the fault of Israeli citizens that some countries despise them, but the Israeli government is actually being oppressive towards Palestinians. I hate to say this, but if the Jews should have their own country, they should have been friendlier towards Palestine and Palestinians rather than oppressing them. Until now, there are some non-Arab people that has a negative view on Israel.

Though holding an Israeli passport has an oppressive side, lemme tell you that you have the opportunity of visiting most of South America, Japan and the EU/EFTA/Schengen Area at the same time–which means that holding an Israeli passport is similar to holding a Hong Kong and Macanese passport. Some Israelis might accept this fact, but some think that there should something be done in order to allow Israeli citizens to travel these states.

It’s a good thing that there are countries that simply impose visa rules towards other countries, rather than rejecting their passports. It means that they maintain good relations with one another, even though they bully other countries. For instance, China and the Philippines. Even though the Chinese government despises PNoy, they still welcome ordinary Filipino citizens to enter their country (provided that visas are already in Philippine passports). There is no such thing as “obsessive hatred” against each other, despite the territorial dispute controversy between China vs. its neighbors.

No wonder, I still look up to China despite being a bully country. Well, the reasons why the Philippines has good ties with other states and nations is because the Marcoses and former President Gloria M. Arroyo made efforts to make friends with different world leaders. Look at PGMA, even though she broke her promise with former US President George W. Bush, the USA and the Philippines are still allies. The yellow oligarchs cannot actually do that–you have to say something GOOD about the country and not bully the Philippines just to get close to them.

Best Passports have good diplomatic ties with other countries as great powers

Most countries in Europe and North America have the best passports mainly because they have the most stable form of government and has the power to exercise their policies to influence everyone. No wonder, many Filipino citizens opt to be dual citizens to travel without any restrictions. They may use their Philippine passport to travel towards the rest of Southeast Asia, but they’ll need their other passport to travel to Europe.

Worst Passports actually do not offer security and safety for tourists

Well, not all countries aren’t too dangerous for the traveller, but you see, political turmoil actually is a distraction to allow their citizens to enjoy visa-free travel. However, there are countries that really impose visas to almost every country in the world, that’s why in return, countries who suffer on their visa policies have their revenge (lol).


I have a question for you, guys. If you happen to be a dual citizen and your other country requires you to choose just one citizenship at the legal age, will you accept this fact or not? Why or why not?


1.) One citizenship of yours allows you to travel in 170+ countries yet requires you to choose one citizenship while the other allows dual citizenship but only lets you travel to just 60+ and below countries. (Or the other way around)

2.) If you actually need to apply for permission to retain your other citizenship to remain dual?

A Gaijin’s Perspective: Should Japan allow multiple citizenship?

Credits to yousuke_ito via for this one!

Introductory Text

Sooooo yeah! Imma back, guys! Well, sorry for not posting things here in my main blog since I have err… a little or no more motivation to post things, but yeah… can’t be helped!

But as promised, I’m back! However, without Photoshop CS6 Extended in my lappie (aww… just Lightroom, that’s it) and without anything that will motivate me to improve my photography skills (how I miss photography, but I realized that it’s more convenient to have a smaller DSLR than a medium-sized one).

But no worries guys, I have learned the hard way: We don’t need Photoshop if we could capture great photos, right? After all, being Photoshop-dependent sucks real dick, amaright!?

Well here, this is serious business. Today (or tonight in my country, haha!), I am gonna discuss the benefits and downsides of dual (or multiple) citizenship and why should the Japanese government accept Kono Taro-sama’s proposal–with modifications, of course.

What is multiple citizenship?

Multiple citizenship… in general, is a situation wherein an individual holds more than one citizenship–meaning to say that he/she’s protected by more than one country’s laws (correct me for me grammer… lol). Each independent entity has its own laws regarding multiple citizenship.

A person could acquire at least two citizenships: One citizenship is something which a person is born with and another citizenship is something that a person acquired through naturalization. Most people are born with single citizenship, but nowadays, more and more children are born with more than one citizenship.

Single citizens – Usually, these people were born in their home country (parents’ domicile/hometown) or in a foreign country (countries which follow the jus sanguinis principle). If a person is born in the Philippines with Filipino parents, of course these parents should be Filipino citizens who do not hold another citizenship.

Example: A person born in the Philippines to Filipino parents, or a person born somewhere in the Middle East to Filipino parents (take note that most Middle Eastern countries, esp. the monarch-runned ones, do not allow naturalization AT ALL). I really didn’t expect that one of my acquaintances was born in Saudi Arabia.

Notable people: Venus Raj (born in Qatar), Jessy Mendiola (born in the United Arab Emirates/UAE), Korina Sanchez (born in Hong Kong), Isla Fischer (Australian actress, born in Oman), Liv Ullmann (Norwegian actress, born in Japan)

Multiple citizens – Usually, these people were born with more than one citizenship. Most of these people were either born with Filipino parents in a jus soli country (Canada and the United States), or is usually mixed-raced. Most people who are under this category have parents who do not have the same citizenship.

Example: A Filipino person born to Filipino parents in the United States of America, or a half-Filipino, half-British person born in the Philippines or in Britain but holds British and Filipino citizenship at the same time.

Notable people: Joyce Jimenez (born in the United States to Filipino parents), G Toengi (father is Swiss-American, and sources say that she was born in US soil), Kaye Abad (born in the United States to Filipino parents), Natalie Portman (mother is American while father is an Israeli), Nicole Kidman (born in Hawaii to Australian parents), Roger Federer (born in Switzerland which is his domicile, but also has South African citizenship through his mother), Heidi Klum (German model, naturalized as an American citizen for her children), Kirsten Dunst (American actress, naturalized as German through her father), Charlize Theron (South African actress, naturalized as American in 2007 due to visa restrictions on a South African passport), Rachel Weisz (British actress, naturalized as American)… to be honest, there are a LOT, actually!

Notable people who hold more than two citizenships: Flynn Bloom (born in the United States to Orlando Bloom who is British and Miranda Kerr who is Australian), Christianne Amanpour (has a British mother and an Iranian father but naturalized as an American through marriage), G Toengi (American, Filipino and Swiss)

Actually, these are some examples I can give you so far. YEAH, most of these people are celebrities because one of my professors in college said that holding more than one citizenship is actually very expensive (he said that holding more than one citizenship is for the rich)–since you have to pay taxes in both countries. No wonder, I will show you both the benefits and the downsides of being a multiple citizen.

Benefits of being a multiple citizen

Credits to @gtongi via

1.) Visa-free access to other countries without a visa – Usually, if you’re Filipino and you hold citizenship in first-world countries (USA, Japan, Singapore, Brunei, Germany, Israel, Finland, Sweden), you could actually travel in as much many countries as you like, but not all countries could be accessed without a prior-to-arrival visa. As a matter of fact, the only advantage of Filipino citizens over Japanese citizens is that, Filipinos could travel to Brazil without a visa, while Japanese citizens need to acquire a visa prior to their Brazilian trip. Here, this shows that holding more than one citizenship would bring you more benefits like visa-free access to popular destinations such as Southeast Asia, East Asia and the Schengen Area… and the Anglophone world.

Example: Filipino + USA/Canada/Japan/Australia/UK citizenship = A-OK; Filipino + not first-world citizenship = depends.

2.) Regionalism – Filipino citizens have the freedom to visit the rest of Southeast Asia without a visa (of course, the Philippines finally has visa-free access to Myanmar… recently) while former Soviet blocs could access their fellow former Soviet comrade countries without any visa, but it still depends upon the situation. Canadian citizens could enter the United States without a visa waiver at all, and New Zealanders could visit Australia without a visa waiver. Don’t you know that it’s only the USA and Australia that have a visa waiver policy? Canada, the United Kingdom and the rest of the Anglophone countries do not have the same policy as Oz and the US of A, but somehow they allow these countries to visit their territory without any visa at all.

For instance, if you hold Filipino and American/British/Australian/Canadian citizenship, you could access Southeast Asia without a visa with your Philippine passport, while you could enter the Schengen area with your other passport.

3.) You could buy real estate/land property in some countries – The Philippines is the best example of a country that does not allow foreigners to buy land property in Philippine soil–no wonder, there are condominium units that are actually more expensive than a townhouse. Somehow, if you naturalize yourself as an American citizen and have plans to re-acquire Filipino citizenship, that is because you want to have your own land property in the Philippines… and retire there.

4.) You’re protected by the law–two constitutions/basic laws, that is – I ain’t sure about this one, but you could file for divorce if you’re a citizen of another country since the Philippines is the only country that does not recognize divorce as means of legally separating a couple (actually, I am into divorce–but it should have a minimum price of 1 million pesos, so that people will think twice before proceeding).

5.) You could work as an expat or immigrant worker (without restrictions, maybe) – Expatriates (formal for expats) usually refer to people with a white-collar job in another country while immigrant workers refer to people who work in a foreign country–but in a blue-collar job. Well, you’re considered an immigrant worker if you work as a factory worker or as a caregiver/domestic helper, while if you’re in another country yet you’re a businessman or company employee, you are considered an expatriate. Well, our acquaintances who have connection to Canada generally had blue-collar jobs, but they returned to the Philippines because yeah, Canada’s quite a laid-back country. And too quiet to get started with.

Now you know what the difference between an immigrant worker and an expat is: Expat refers to a white-collar job worker, while an immigrant worker usually refers to a person doing manual labor/factory work, or in other words, a blue-collar job.

Downsides of multiple citizenship

1.) TAXES – The burden of paying taxes. No wonder only the well-off people could afford holding more than one citizenship. Well, you really have to work hard if you want to acquire another citizenship.

Source: Wikipedia

2.) Conflict with another country – If you happen to be an Israeli citizen, you are not spared when it comes to the Arab League’s visa policies. Even ordinary passport holders are actually not allowed to enter oil-rich countries unless they have a special permit coming from the Israeli government. Worse, some of these Arab countries reject not only Israeli passports, but also non-Israeli passports with an Israel stamp on it (yes, the Arab League is really hostile towards Israel as their stance of support towards Palestine, and Israel happens to be an ally of the United States, no wonder). While Hong Kong recently imposed sanctions towards Filipino citizens who hold an official or a diplomatic passport, it’s a good thing that they spared ordinary passport holders as a sign that the Hong Kong government gives sanctions to Filipino government officials and representatives, but not ordinary citizens of the Philippines.

Side Note: Israeli citizens could enter the Arab League with “special permission” from the government.

Taiwanese citizens, on the other hand, could not access Brazil without a “special visa” since both countries do not maintain diplomatic relations with each other.|Rain being as “Jeong Ji Hoon” for being drafted into the South Korean army.

3.) Conscription – This is another problem if you’re a multiple citizen. In the Philippines, one is required to choose between ROTC (military training) and CWTS (community service). Usually, dual citizens will choose CWTS because ROTC is mainly about conscription. Military service usually requires people who have just one citizenship… dunno with multiple citizens. This is probably the reason why South Korea didn’t allow multiple citizenship before 2011 (multiple citizenship is allowed now, but pars with the multiple citizenship policies of the Netherlands and Norway). In other words, it’s still QUOTA.

South Koreans actually have this problem. Prior to 2011, usually, most South Korean mothers give birth to the United States because they don’t want their sons to join the military service, which is mandatory. However, there are still South Korean men who are still WILLING to be conscripted.|King Rama IX playing the saxophone. Take note that he was born in the United States of America.

4.) Citizenship issues among monarchs – Well, if you happen to be a monarch (male), you have to beg for the government to have a certain agreement that this place has to be a temporary exclave of your country just for your spouse to give birth to your child just in case you’re in exile. No wonder, Thailand does not allow multiple citizenship at all since their King was born in the United States of America (which is jus soli).

5.) NSTP (National Service Training Program) – If you’re a Filipino citizen, you have to undergo this process. It may seem to be “AWW” to you, but to those who don’t like ROTC, CWTS is always there. Yes, Filipino citizens who hold another citizenship have a hesitation of choosing between ROTC and CWTS, but if you were to ask me, CWTS is a safer choice–you explore ALL the walks of life, and it’s better than undergoing religious community service (if you’re Lasallian and you took up TREDTWO).

Multiple citizenship in Japan

Now here’s err… something I would like to share with you guys. Basically, Japan does not allow multiple citizenship (or at least, dual) because one government official said that it might cause conflict to a person, and the government wants its citizens to follow the “stick-to-one” rule, when it comes to citizenship.

Well, it is actually a burden if you happen to be a Japanese citizen and yet you hold another citizenship. For me, not allowing your citizens to obtain two passports just because it might cause conflict doesn’t always mean they’ll always be a magnet of any chaotic dilemmas regarding citizenship. Hapas in Japan have this dilemma of just choosing one citizenship since they have no choice but to have two citizenships. I don’t think hapa celebrities like Becky Rabone and Christel Takigawa were willing to choose just one citizenship, but because of the nationality law of Japan, they still have to choose one. Becky decided to drop her British citizenship since obviously, she’s more Japanese than British. I’m not sure if Christel chose Japanese over French. But I’m sure, there are lots of hapa celebrities who do not want to renounce their other citizenship. So far, I have heard that Yuu Shirota decided to keep his Spanish citizenship, though he was born in Tokyo, but I ain’t sure if he chose Spanish.

Speaking of the multiple citizenship proposal by LDP dude (not sure if he’s still the leader) Kono Taro-sama, it was rather been rejected because the process of making his bill into a law doesn’t seem to be very clear–however, speaking of Kono-sama’s policies, it seems that he’s like the Japanese BongBong Marcos since his policies are awesome–but to tell you the truth, he lacks charisma. But still, he’s still my favorite Japanese politician (LOL), just like how I admire Condoleeza Rice and Kanzlerin Angela Merkel. Can I just add that he favors Japan to have its own military.|Kare wa Kono Taro-sama desu. The Asian look-alike of Stephen Hawking but his ideas are similar with Senator BongBong Marcos.

Here’s Kono-sama’s proposal.

Hmmm… I guess something’s missing. He should have also considered the “permission required” policy which is actually a thing of German-speaking countries (hence, the word Beibehaltungsgenehmigung [Beibe-haltungs-gemehnigung], which means retention approval. Yes, I admit it’s too freaking long, but what do you expect on German compound words, lol). Actually, die Beibehaltungsgenehmigung is actually beneficial since this will ease down Japan’s citizenship laws. I repeat, having this implemented towards Japanese citizens who hold more than one citizenship could apply whether they’re willing to retain both citizenships or not. This is also a big help to foreigners who are willing to naturalize as Japanese citizens but still want to retain their original citizenship.

Yes, actually Kono-sama should have thought of the Japanese version of die Beibehaltungsgenehmigung (リテンション承認, Ritenshon shounin) so that it would be fair for everyone who holds Japanese citizenship to have another citizenship.

A Gaijin’s Perspective: Should Japan allow multiple citizenship?

Well, coming from a gaijin myself (speaking of Japanese society), my answer goes to a big YES. For one, if you hold a Japanese passport (Nihonkoku Ryoken), you have the freedom to travel towards the Schengen Area and the rest of the European union without a visa, and not only that, you could travel in China without a visa.

Side Note: To those chauvinists who think I don’t have the right to an opinion with regards to a foreign country’s citizenship laws, then it cannot be helped. But still, what about those foreigners who want to have another citizenship? Well, I believe that patriotism is not based on a person’s nationality within itself, but it’s also on how they love their country unconditionally.

The similarities between a Filipino and a Japanese passport is that, you could enter Morocco without a visa (oh yes, OT BTW, my Emirati friends and Israeli buddies could meet there haha). Being Filipino myself, I am willing to have Japanese citizenship IF and ONLY IF Japan will allow dual citizenship, provided that they impose the Beibehaltungsgemehnigung in all aspects.

Yes, I think having more than one citizenship has more advantages than disadvantages, if you’re not into having yourself drafted to military service. Well, Singapore still does not allow dual citizenship, while South Korea allowed it but with certain conditions (aww… it’s also great to hold Korean citizenship, actually)–prolly because of the military service thing (which is actually good, I tell you).

Also, if you happen to be a dual citizen, if you don’t like ROTC (hahaha, ang bad ko talaga), you choose CWTS freely, but those who are dual citizens but WANTS ROTC are sad because of the policies. Oh my.

However, I’m telling you: Having more than one citizenship isn’t that bad. No wonder, the reason why I prefer having a Japanese citizenship as my other citizenship because I consider Japan as my second home. Also, I won’t mind being married to a Japanese guy, it’s just that he has to be the liberated type of guy (not really the Westernized type, but the one who is at least, open-minded). Also, I won’t mind speaking up for foreigners who are willing to naturalize as Japanese citizens, especially those who come from third-world countries (mostly from Africa and Asia), but are still willing to retain the citizenship they’re born with.

Also, don’t you know that there are a lot of Filipino-Japanese people who like to keep both citizenships? Well, I may not have done a survey just yet, but to be honest, being Filipino-Japanese is a privilege. Most of them consider themselves more Filipino than Japanese, but they wouldn’t want to give up their Japanese citizenship since their Japanese passports could let them go places. But, if some of them accept the fact that Japan does not allow dual citizenship, they’ll choose Japanese for travel purposes OR, if they live in Japan already. But some of them still chose Filipino because they think they’re at home when they choose Filipino citizenship even though Filipino passports don’t share the same privilege as Japanese passports. This applies if they settle permanently in the Philippines.

I’m not sure if Filipino-Koreans have the same issue as well since the Republic of Korea (my other favorite country even though I’m not a fan of K-Pop) recently allowed multiple citizenship with certain conditions. However, as far as I know, before 2011, half-Koreans should choose just one citizenship at the age of 18 years old (without the age reckoning system, I guess).

Well, since Japan’s already losing manpower (majority are yes, old people, the ojiisans and the obaasans), I guess it’s time for them to allow dual citizenship and ease their immigration laws since there are a lot of foreigners who are willing to naturalize as Japanese citizens, or to work there and learn the language and culture. I guess Japan should realize that citizenship is not simply about one race, but it should be conforming to their society–and speaking Nihongo, of course.

Of course, Japan’s nationality law dictates that Japanese people should “stick to one” when it comes to obtaining another citizenship, or to naturalize as Japanese, since Japanese society has been maintaining the value of being loyal to a single nation, which I do respect. However, I believe that having dual citizenships won’t make you less of your other identity. For instance, being Filipino-Japanese. YES, being half-Japanese won’t ever make you less of a Filipino, and being half-Filipino won’t make you less of a Japanese. Look at Sayaka Akimoto. She used to have insecurities with regards to being half-Filipino, but she realized that being half-Filipino is something that she should be proud of. After all, we Filipinos are proud of her. Pretty, talented and whatnot, she’s perfection! She’s always welcome in the Philippines, and we love her.

It was really surprising that Sayaka Akimoto was born in the Philippines. Well, Wikipedia is always distorted, that’s why when I learned that she wasn’t born in Japan, I was like, “OMG!” The video is still “bitin” (word for “lacking”), therefore I was like cringing.

I think Sayaka could speak Filipino when she was younger, but then she lost the ability to speak it when she and her family moved to Japan at such a very young age. No wonder, she might be one of those hapas who hesitated to renounce their citizenship.

Ironically, Japanese channels promote multiculturalism through their celebrities travelling across the globe, but still, in their own country, why can’t they simply allow foreigners to conform to their society and consider them as Japanese? Why do they still believe that being monoracial is something that should be placed in value?

I really cannot blame Japanese society for being too homogeneous, however, since the world is already getting smaller and smaller, I guess Japan should allow multiple citizenship since “extreme loyalty” is simply a thing of the past. Globalization embraces a lot of cultures, and I guess Japan should embrace multiculturalism, while retaining their traditions, of course. They’re very well-known to balance the old and new, and the East and the West–but why are they still discouraging their people from having more than one citizenship? I may not be in the right position to judge them, but who knows, hopefully they’ll allow their citizens and gaijins to obtain more than one citizenship in the future. As of now, multiple nationality is still under a heated debate there (even though they recently rejected Kono-sama’s proposal, which is understandable because there are a few lapses in his proposal–and not only Kono-sama himself could propose a law by himself alone; it needs approval by consensus, or slight modifications).

Summary and Conclusions

After all, being a multiple citizen won’t hurt, for as long as you abide by the laws and know how to handle finances correctly, because at the end of the day, globalization is inevitable.

As for Japan, I guess I am still hopeful that they will allow multiple citizenship for hapas and for foreigners who are willing to retain their original citizenship while acquiring a new one. Like what I have said before, multiple citizenship has its own pros and cons, and speaking of which, it is still the person who will decide whether they should choose their citizenship, regardless of their nationality.

Here, if I were to acquire Japanese citizenship, that won’t make me less of a Filipino since I still consider myself a Filipino–but I still prefer having more than one citizenship in order to travel around the world without a visa–and to work in another country.

I am also fighting for people who wish to acquire another citizenship in their second home. Like me, I consider the Philippines as my home, and whenever I leave valuables, it’s alright since the Philippines is still home to me even though it’s not a rich country. However, when I stepped in Japanese soil, I told to myself, “I will make this my second home… soon!” Yes, it actually came true–I consider Japan as my second home, even though the cost of living there is high. I could imagine myself either living there or fall for a Japanese guy (with a globalized background of course).

To end this discussion, to be honest, there are a lot more details I will discuss. I think, I’ll just post the sources so that everyone will understand why multiple citizenship is more beneficial than a threat. At the end of the day, it is still the person who defines his/her identity, and being of course, let’s say, half-Greek half-Persian won’t make someone less Greek or less Persian. In other words, you cannot force someone to choose just one identity.

Lessons Learned from Haiyan/Yolanda

What taught me a lesson from Haiyan/Yolanda is UNITY among the Filipino people and the Visayan people. It is now time for us to DROP our crab mentality and START UNITING AND JOINING FORCES with one another.

Indeed, most of the Filipino public officials should realize that P-Noy is no way to be a superhero. Hello, P-Noy is not a superhero, he’s not even Jesus Christ, and he is still a homo sapien after all. In fact, these public officials should DO THIER FREAKING JOB rather (and HELP P-Noy) than to immerse themselves with all these luxury items. It really makes me sick when these officials are not even moving!

In addition, it’s NOT ONLY Tacloban that was deeply affected by Haiyan. In fact, there are MORE places in Eastern Visayas that suffered a greater impact than Tacloban. Why focus only on Tacloban? Why not give equal treatment towards other devastated places just like how they view Tacloban?

After all, I was right. After the Napoles trial in the Senate, I guess Haiyan was a punishment from God, but the said super-typhoon with a massive Storm Signal greater than 4 hit the WRONG areas. I guess, God is sending a message to these politicians. Well, you cannot blame science. Science generally covers the grey areas, that’s why sometimes, you’ll wonder why if a storm is a punishment from God, it hits the wrong areas. Here, the situation would be Black and White if Haiyan/Yolanda hit the houses of the Napoles family, or even the houses of Tanda, Pogi and Sexy (well, I would give a round of applause if Haiyan hit those areas rather than Eastern Visayas).

Here, I really cannot help but donate my money from the alkansya. At least, I am helping those people in need, and Haiyan survivors.

Masasabi na natin na mas may asim pa ang mga artistang tumulong sa mga nangangailangan doon sa Silangang Kabisayaan, kumpara naman kay Tanda. Dito rin natin mapapansin kung gaano nila tinupad ang kasabihang, “Generosity out of Excess.” Buti na lang at sila pa ang may puso, gaya ni Angel Locsin, pati na rin si Megastar Sharon Cuneta at ang anak niyang si KC Concepcion.

Mahiya-hiya naman sana ang mga publikong opisyal na walang ginawa kundi unahin ang sariling luho. Pati na rin ang mga NAPULIS!

I guess after all, Haiyan, is cruel in nature. Yes, indeed. We should bring back the old veterans with the “asim” in them. Here, you’ll see how they love their country and chose to be Filipinos in the Philippines serving our country–which means that they deserve to be the public officials of our country, but as what Vic Sotto said, “You don’t need to run for a position to serve other people.”

I think Haiyan has taught us a lesson NOT to be racist to our own. The only reason why we think that it’s wrong is because we are racist to our own kind, which is fucking ridiculous. Besides, our leaders never set a good example to our country, which causes crab mentality. We should initiate social change by helping one another and drop crab mentality in our culture. Let us start helping our FELLOW Filipinos and co-operate with our foreign friends in order to re-build our country.

To these countries who sent donations to Haiyan survivors and victims, I really owe you a debt of gratitude, in behalf of all the Filipinos as a whole. I salute you for your efforts, especially to our allies US and Japan for sending us your generous side. To Japan, we really appreciate it that you’re paying it forward to us–after we helped you when your people suffered the cruelty of an earthquake and tsunami at the same time.

Indeed, it is saying that Visayas suffered an earthquake… then suffered a super-typhoon–which means that history of the 3/11 calamity in Japan repeated itself.

This is not yet the end of my post. I still have to share my sentiments later. I still do not know how to say all my sentiments just yet. I guess, this would be for now.

Rare Interview with Mayor Sara Duterte

Even though she’s a toughie, she did not like the fame or the “infamy” she received during the incident.

Well, at first I thought she’s very close with her father, but it turns out that she is waaay different from Mayor Rody. They’re not close, but they ain’t foes, either. That made me respect someone like her more: Balance between matapang and keeping a low profile. At least she learned from her mistakes. Even though she did not like doing it, well, it can’t be helped. She needed to go ballistic to express herself.

I hope judgmental people will wake up with their boxed minds. *winkz*

Late Post: Atlantis Production’s Piaf

I could not recall about what happened in the storyline of Piaf, but I think this was the only play I’ve watched that is not even school-related.

Actually, I was not interested to watch any play, but because one of my close friends introduced me to someone hmmm… (I don’t wanna elaborate further), well, I just said “yes” when he asked me if I’m interested in watching a play. When we went to the venue itself, nako, RCBC plaza has nothing really very special to offer except the facade of the building itself–and the auditorium is small, just like the audi that I went where I watched “King Lear” in the Filipino version. Well, I should have not worn a gown or a formal dress since my companion is super filthy rich (and tbh, he’s quite choosy and too particular with clothes–he has the traits of Komikado Kensuke, but less exaggerated).

The Whole Play

I didn’t expect that the play is about the personal life of Edith Piaf, and actually, the lights, the stage props, the costume, it shows the ambience of the mid- to late-19th century up to the early phase of the 20th century in France. The actors are really very professional, especially the likes of Pinky Amador and G Toengi. While I really liked the play in some aspects, I am not really much into Western-influenced form of entertainment, or any English-speaking play with this defined accent that we hear (in fact, I believe I’m more like a mediator between “sosyal” and “maka-masa” stuff). If you were to ask me, “Haring Lear” was more relatable and the actors are friendlier to the audience after the play (only a handful of the Piaf cast actually bothered to interact with the audience after the play). However, in Piaf, you’ll learn a lot of new stuff about history, and including the Nazi regime isn’t new to me after all. In fact, Piaf lived a very tragic life, and it really manifested that she’s more human, alongside the actors during the classical film age (to name a few, Audrey Hepburn, Greta Garbo, Brigitte Bardot, Rita Hayworth, Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor).

Pinky Amador did a very great job portraying Piaf. As much as I do admire her as a thespian, I really hated her in her role as Mei Mei in “Mangarap Ka,” starring Piolo Pascual. In contrast to Chin-Chin Gutierrez, she knows how to adjust herself from stage to onscreen drama. When her (Pinky) acting is for the stage, it’s for the stage, and when she’s onscreen, her acting suits right for the screen.

In the play, I also didn’t expect that I would encounter G Toengi in person, and yes, she’s also a stage performer. However, just like Chin-Chin, her acting isn’t really apt onscreen (check out her role as Stella in “Aryana”). I think she failed to adjust again when she came back from the US (she tried her luck to be in Hollywood). I thought she was snob at first since she went straight home from the play and did not interact with Pinky and the rest of the team, but when I tweeted to her on Twitter, she proved me wrong. She replied and told me to spread the word. I’d say that she’s really a great person inside and out, but since I am not very familiar with her personal life, I won’t turn on my Perez Hilton mode against her. Haha.

This play is something remarkable, which makes Pinky Amador a true-blooded and a legit thespian. No wonder, she has been well-respected in the showbiz industry as a pro and as a veteran as well.

Rating (4.0 as the highest, 1.0 as the lowest): 3.0-3.5

PinoyMonkeyPride’s own version of comparing Presidential vs. Parliamentary government

I could not help but agree with this whole video. I guess the Philippines should rather be a parliament rather than a presidential republic. After all, I could now see that the video about the Aquino-Cojuangco clan has some truths on it.

[Side Note: It’s only those who despise the Martial Law who do not agree with the facts stated by PMP]

However, when it comes to PMP’s way of showing that the Cojuangco-Aquino clan is still the center topic, well, why can’t they shift from one clan to another!? Sukang-suka na kami sa Aquino-Cojuangco clan, eh. Maiba naman.

Roaming Around MOA for the nth time plus shopping around Greenhills

So, for the nth time we visited MOA.



Awwwww cute dog! Well, still a cynophobe, though (huhuhu).

Oh well, so there are plenty of options when you’re in MOA.


Yes, there is our cosplay queen Alodia! Hooray for being nationwide popular! Haha!




So we ate at Teriyaki Boy and boy, we finished everything in no time! Haha!


So there’s the ferris wheel!



We soon went to Greenhills just to hunt for gadgets (gadget-hunting has always been my outdoor hobby ever since LMAO) and it seemed that it was more fun if we did not ran out much time from walking. At the highest floor of the shopping mall itself, well, that was was the haven for the cheapest gadgets in Metro Manila.

Most sellers there are Muslim people. Well, too bad I did not take a photo of the place although I’d like to do so. Most gadgets there are legit ones that are either brand new or second-hand. The place itself is more of a horror-themed gadget shop since there are many second-hand gadgets there that were stolen from their original owners. I could see that these salespeople have little knowledge in gadgets–in other words, it’s a jeje-mall (IMHO!). Well, hey! They still sell iPhone 3GS and 4 models (brand new or second-hand). It’s very weird since most of these gadgets are not China phones or shanzhai products, which makes it as a safe heaven for power users and anti-shanzhai people to lure the place itself. However, speaking of iPhone cases, they have the most beautiful and good-looking ones. Also, they’re much cheaper (whether it’s a gadget or a casing) compared to those sold at Apple Resellers and shops such as Infomax.

Here’s what I’ve got from GH:


See? They range from 250-300 Php which make them very affordable if your budget is in a maximum of 3,000 Php. I would recommed GH if you’re going to shop for cheap and affordable items such as casings and accessories, but for gadgets, stay vigilant.

The ambience resembles Quiapo’s Hidalgo and Beijing’s Wangfujing corner (looking in photos). However, if you visit the second to the highest floor, you’ll appreciate it there more if you could afford them.

Sadly I did not bring my digital SLR, but it’s alright. I’ll still consider this place when buying external flash guns. (:

Let me get this straight

What I’m saying about the results of the elections (if you have Facebook and you live in the Philippines, you’ll see what’s going on), I really feel very disappointed and extremely frustrated at the same time.

Well, the only popular people who are more credible and more commendable would be no other than Grace Poe, Cynthia Villar and some people out there who at least have a track record of some achievements and blah blah blah.

But… Nancy Binay and the rest of those who still have a long way to go!?

Nope, I despise the “n*gga” not basically because she’s dark-skinned or what, anong kinalaman ng signature kulay niya sa pulitika!? Well, basically, she’s only a mere product of the political dynasty–no wonder mas konti ang bashers ni Bam Aquino (if you’re going to compare him to the n*gga, at least Bam, despite being a product of a political dynasty, is exposed to politics–Roxyisferox stated that he has leadership skills and experience).


It should also be taken note that not all feisty or palaban women are palengkera, walang breeding, et cetera.

It’s like a mere comparison between the n*gga and Risa Hontiveros. Don’t gemme started on Risa. Sure, she has this certain face value that we cannot deny, but beyond that, she’s someone worth to be on a coveted position–and to other people who deserve the position better than the popular ones.

Now why the EFF should we vote for popularity alone?

At least, if I were to be asked, I’d rather choose Grace Poe since she has been an MTRCB chairperson.

Well, now I could see the good side with being palaban ever since Katrina Halili (seems irrelevant . If you’re talking about Annabelle Rama, sure, she’s very feisty and very thick-faced, but mind you that she didn’t win the elections. Overall, she should lower her pride.

Well, ego-istic naman talaga kasi si Bisaya, eh. No wonder, people would love bitching around her.

But it’s a good thing that Tita Bisaya is more than willing to be happy for her opponent. Well, they may rant that Cebuanos are wiser than Manilenyos, but the reason why they chose the opponent is because–Bisaya does not know anything about legislation. Kung tutuusin, she’s too old to run for a position.

People choose the person who is not even deserving to win at the first place

One thing that I’d like to tell them: (Salutes middle finger) P*+@ng !n@ n’yong lahat!

Remember that we should serve as a role model towards them–that we choose people who are not even that overhyped at the first place.

Side Note: One thing that I hate about these people is that, they only care about their stomachs (you have to bribe the masa as a politician and meet their needs rather than doing your over-all techniques/methods–you hafta be a traditionalist, in short). Sure, Georgina Wilson ranted against the people of Manila who voted for Erap, but she’s really slamming their over-all beliefs. Granted, Erap may be tainted in terms of reputation, but you’ll never deny that he is pro-masa–kaya buti na lang sinita ni Jake Ejercito, eh.

Vice Ganda here has substance. Sure, he hinted the “n*gga” for not following Junjun Binay’s footsteps first or let’s say… she has a long way to go–however, Vice majored in PolSci. So far, at least may nasabi siya despite being an insult comedian.

Overall, it’s Vice who is wiser than Georgi Fiveheads.

But it’s not about the stomachs that you should therefore target. It should be how they view mass media as a whole. As a matter of fact, lack of access towards education should no longer be an excuse to vote wisely. It should be vigilance that should be met.

I hate to brag, but I’m more vigilant than the rest of those I really know who has a “popular kid” mentality.

Side Note: See? Kung sino pa nga ang hindi deserving maging class/block president sa school, sila pa ang binoboto natin. Overall, political maturity starts in a classroom. I even cringed when our block leader was no other than the one who has this “bully” attitude (to think na gaijin siya). Eh siya nga, hindi nga niya matiis ‘yung pinaka-legendary na professor na kinatatakutan (kuno) ng inner circle namin, eh. (HAHAHAHA, allow me to talk frankly this time)

After all, I am more vigilant, and I could identify who deserves that position. At the first place, that person does not even deserve to be our leader. Frankly speaking, siya pa ang bully sa akin… eh.

Kita niyo? Kung mataas pala ang pride niya, why can’t that person just err… endure that “professor”? That professor really tests on how you bind other people–in short, it tests your sense of leadership.

Hahaha, ‘kala lang nila that I’m nobody to them? Personally, if I were to be asked, a leader should not be a bully and an initiator of all mischief. Well, after all, I’m smarter than them (bad joke, my bad LOL).

So these people after all allow themselves to be deprived of their basic needs!? TENGENE! They think that their stomachs and the mass media rule their life if there is actually more to that. In fact, the system is not the only thing to blame–it should be lack of vigilance that should be blamed.

Now I could come up with a synthesis that: These majority of the voters are similar to the judges who choose beauty over beauty and brains in a beauty pageant.

Bribery is similar to casting couch.

Don’t allow a bully to deprive you from your basic needs

One advice to the masa and to those who possess popular kid in high school mentality. After all, it is the popular kids in college who are better off than the HS popular kids (who happens to be “nobodies” in the social circle).

Travelling Alone in the Mall

There is a reason why I chose to be alone when in a mall.


Of course, exploring a certain place by yourself equates to independence. Okay, so to speak, I was in SM Mall of Asia… after being invited to this event:


At least I feel overwhelmed to go explore on my own hihihi.

So, here goes.

I went on the gadgets corner, which is something that I was looking for all along. When I got there, I was thinking whether to explore that place whether if it’s impressive or not.

I checked out some gadgets: One is the Samsung Galaxy Camera, Sony Xperia Z (for the second to the nth time) and lastly, the iPod touch 5th generation. Well, I was not very impressed with how the Galaxy Camera worked because I cannot log in on Instagram, but then, this should not serve as a conclusion just yet. As a matter of fact, the Galaxy Camera is very flexible. Also, it’s kinda big for a digicam. Reminds me of the Polaroid ZINK Digicam! LOL. Overall, it’s one of the gadgets I’m looking forward. Second, I’ve touched the Xperia Z for the nth time. It’s actually like the Galaxy Camera due to its screen size, but it does not fail to impress me for its speed when it comes to Android. No wonder I’m more of a Sony fan than of a Samsung fan (specs- and performance-wise). If it only had Instagram installed on it (the sample phone), nyehehehe! I could be the judge (joke joke joke!). Third, the iTouch 5th gen. Well, it’s like the iPhone, only without the phone, and it’s really like the iPhone 5! I logged in to Instagram and YES! I logged in successfully LIKE A BOSS!


It’s obviously 5 megapixels, speaking of resolution. But I feel much safer with the iPhone 5 since I could surf the net via Wi-Fi or 3G/GPRS/EDGE almost everyday. So no doubt, I am still an Apple fan.

More pics:





That’s all!