Category Archives: Digital SLR Cameras

Behind the Scenes (BTS): PHOTOCO Fashion Shoot

Well, I may have never done a BTS before (dudes and dudettes, I was too lazy doing those things LOL), but this is my first time doing it.

The model, Allen Sales, is excellent in her job. Her poses are very graceful, at least for someone who is a newbie in the modelling industry (well, I’ll post photos of her here… but I won’t for now because I have technical issues! LOL). We just tell her what she should do, and she follows. YES folks, you’ll really be satisfied with all your shots if I recommend her to you. I ain’t kidding, kahit anong damit ang ipasuot mo sa kanya, the shots will turn out to be good.

I just shot many of the scenes using the Canon EOS 60D, of course! I know, I suck in recording videos, but to the elitist negachey haters, you cannot even do this to save yer lives! Take note of that! (LOL)

PHOTOS WILL BE COMING SOON! JUST WAIT!

After the long wait: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II

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SOME THINGS I WOULD LIKE TO TELL TO MY LOVELY FOLLOWERS: I reaaaaaaaally apologize for not posting new blog entries. To be honest, I lost love in blogging and I think that losing my gadgets (all thanks to those… thieves!) and being in law school would make me quit blogging or pursue a photography career, well, I think I should say I am BACK IN ACTION! Yet, I am no longer the same as before, the MSP that you meet online as the bubbly, funny person–I’m not actually that type of person, unless you know me personally. HAHA.

I was broke, really. I would never expect that I would quit blogging because my online friend’s blog was deleted due to an oppressive policy… or maybe the bashers are long waiting to topple down a blog. GAH. WHY DO BAD THINGS HAPPEN, EVEN THOUGH YOU DON’T WISH FOR IT!?

Okay, never mind. Now I have some great news for all of you. Yep, this time I am taking up a short course in photography–this time, it would be photography as my career… hurrah! But remember, this is a much better thing than being in law school. In law school, you only have to be surrounded by books, nothing more, nothing less–but here, I GUESS I HAVE NEVER BEEN THIS HAPPIER! Being in a photog class helped me grow as a person. No kidding. I would say that I have a wider schedule than before. LOL.

Anyways, because of that, I decided to buy a new lens–in exchange of the old lens. Okay, here it is, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II. Well, that’s all I can afford. Never underestimate the cheapest things–it also has a powerful side. Well, take a look.

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Finally… I own a prime lens. With the new cap, though.

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See how sharp this lens is!? Pardon for the photo, this time my photos suck. Not fishing for compliments at all, yet this photo shows the SHARPNESS of the nifty fifty!

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They say that this lens is used to take portraits… but meh, BTW this is Ma-yeen. ((: Almost perfect photograph ugh. The nifty fifty is too difficult to use! LOL.

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Dream lens! Huhuhu… it costs 45,000 pesos! T_T Sa bagay, it’s an L lens.

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Check this out, people. The more you worship the Yellow Oligarchs (well, not only PNoy), the more poverty you will feel. Think again. The Yellow Oligarchs are the pestilence, not Marcos or Gloria or Erap, or anyone who are the enemies of the oligarchs. The price tag says it all. It’s up to you to evaluate (LOL photojourn mode).

Comments

The nifty fifty is actually a very powerful lens–just imagine the wide opening–at f/1.8, at 115 dollars. Yes, this lens ain’t very cheap (if you’re a full-time student) at all, to think that it’s the most inexpensive lens in the market. It is also difficult to use, since it is macro-incapable. Despite the wide aperture it offers, the 1:3 macro ratio is sacrificed. Boo-hoo.

As a matter of fact, the nifty fifty has taught me that zoom lenses are more flexible yet it won’t offer you a fixed aperture unless you want a costlier lens (the 28-70mm, for instance). Zoom lenses have the widest aperture of f/2.8 since it’s more expensive to create zoom lenses with wider apertures–the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 broke the stereotype. After all, Sigma is known for innovating lenses–they have art lenses + lens dock for updating firmware. Cool, isn’t it?

Time for you to snag a prime

Prime lenses is said to have better optical quality than zoom lenses. Here, primes vary from the extremes to the middle ground. The extremes are waaay costlier than the non-extremes since you’re dealing with distortion and distance. Just imagine having an EF 14mm L lens or the EF 800mm L lens–better get a nifty fifty or a 35mm lens, or an 85mm lens.

Zoom lenses are great, but if you want MORE depth-of-field adventures + more light and blur background, primes are the best option.

Roaming Around MOA for the nth time plus shopping around Greenhills

So, for the nth time we visited MOA.

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Awwwww cute dog! Well, still a cynophobe, though (huhuhu).

Oh well, so there are plenty of options when you’re in MOA.

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Yes, there is our cosplay queen Alodia! Hooray for being nationwide popular! Haha!

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So we ate at Teriyaki Boy and boy, we finished everything in no time! Haha!

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So there’s the ferris wheel!

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We soon went to Greenhills just to hunt for gadgets (gadget-hunting has always been my outdoor hobby ever since LMAO) and it seemed that it was more fun if we did not ran out much time from walking. At the highest floor of the shopping mall itself, well, that was was the haven for the cheapest gadgets in Metro Manila.

Most sellers there are Muslim people. Well, too bad I did not take a photo of the place although I’d like to do so. Most gadgets there are legit ones that are either brand new or second-hand. The place itself is more of a horror-themed gadget shop since there are many second-hand gadgets there that were stolen from their original owners. I could see that these salespeople have little knowledge in gadgets–in other words, it’s a jeje-mall (IMHO!). Well, hey! They still sell iPhone 3GS and 4 models (brand new or second-hand). It’s very weird since most of these gadgets are not China phones or shanzhai products, which makes it as a safe heaven for power users and anti-shanzhai people to lure the place itself. However, speaking of iPhone cases, they have the most beautiful and good-looking ones. Also, they’re much cheaper (whether it’s a gadget or a casing) compared to those sold at Apple Resellers and shops such as Infomax.

Here’s what I’ve got from GH:

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See? They range from 250-300 Php which make them very affordable if your budget is in a maximum of 3,000 Php. I would recommed GH if you’re going to shop for cheap and affordable items such as casings and accessories, but for gadgets, stay vigilant.

The ambience resembles Quiapo’s Hidalgo and Beijing’s Wangfujing corner (looking in photos). However, if you visit the second to the highest floor, you’ll appreciate it there more if you could afford them.

Sadly I did not bring my digital SLR, but it’s alright. I’ll still consider this place when buying external flash guns. (:

I finally found these photos!

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They sell iPads and err… counterfeit gadgets (I though SG is ueber-strict!?).

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This was probably taken with a Sigma lens. Try to click on the photo to enlarge (and don’t forget to evaluate its quality!).

I forgot what mall is this located, however, I’d say it’s within Lucky Plaza.

Yes, bitches. This is one shop to avoid (the set-up is shown, eh) when you wanna go to Singapore. Get your arses off to Funan Digital Mall if you don’t want your money to be burned in hell.

Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II

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Since The-Digital-Picture.com does not have the Mark II version review of this lens, I might as well post this review myself.

This is the first time I will make a review about a telephoto lens. Damn, using this for the very first time will make you feel that you’re a paparazzi photographer. Not in this case, since 250mm is still lacking for me, though. I think 300mm would be more than enough for coverage.

Okay, so first off, the EF 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II lens is basically an EF-S lens, which is only exclusive for Canon EOS models with an APS-C sensor, meaning to say that this is not, in any way, compatible with full-frame models.

I consider this lens as a very powerful one.

First of all, telephoto lenses are considered as powerful since they could take a focal length that would take them further, as if you’re far away from the mountain, yet you have taken a photo of a cross within the mountain. That’s lens power.

Quality-wise, the EF-S 55-250mm II lens is even clearer and more pleasing to the eyes in terms of overall quality compared to the Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC lens. It’s quite obvious that you could actually create something out of nothing from a telephoto lens, even though you’re going to shoot landscapes.

Sample Photographs:

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Telephoto lenses take you to the greatest depths of a subject — they make art out of nature. They also make art out of architecture and they also do the things that wide-angle and normal lenses generally do — they could actually take photographs of fireworks at night, provided with their “wide-angle” end.

The EF-S 55-250mm lens is the perfect telephoto lens (or an excellent choice) for beginners. If you’re going to do macro, I think you should start using telephoto lenses first. (:

Gadget dilemma and sales shenanigans in the Sinosphere!

If you’re going to shop in countries like Hong Kong or maybe Singapore, you’d rather do a lot of research regarding shopping tips FIRST before you ask the best and the most reputable shops there.

According to Roland Lim:

Avoid shops that have “Tax Free” sign prominently displayed outside or inside the shop. Another trait of these shops is that, most of them have famous brand names like “Canon”, “Nikon” or “Sony” prominently displayed in large signs outside the shop. However, you will be hard press to actually find the name of the shop anywhere. Legitimate and reputable shop would clearly display the actual name of the shop on the sign outside, not just Canon, Nikon or Sony or whatever famous brand. Most of these shops are found along Nathan Road at Tsim Sha Tsui area. These shops are usually scammers, where “bait and switch” is common . They usually have lots of sales person inside a smallish shop. The ratio of salespersons to shop floor area/clients would be far to high to be profitable if these were legitimate honest shops. There is no sales tax or duty in Hong Kong except hard liquor and tobacco anyway. The “Tax Free” sign is basically just a trap to attract unsuspecting tourist. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!


hkphotoworkshop.com|Don’t be too deceived on these lenses. Eye-candy, isn’t it? (Film cameras included!)


tvxb.com|If you’re going to Tsim Sha Tsui, this is the best shop, and so far the most reputable.


pentaxforums.com|Look what we got here! Wonder if this shop is reputable or not.


travelpod.com|Thanks jbilocca for the photo. I think this shop seems familiar to me.

Yes, I have ranted endlessly about this worst, traumatic experience ever. However, back in PH, I think it’s better to shop in your home country unless the product is not available in your region. If you’re going to ask me about shopping in the Philippines, the most reputable shop would be Infomax (TriNoma and SM Annex). Infomax is the elite version of Hidalgo (haha, never been there) since compare their prices to that of the brochure. If you’re going to analyze brochure prices, Infomax prices are quite lower, but not going to be dramatically cheap (LOL!).

Luckily, I am not alone in terms of sales dilemma in the Sinosphere.

So yeah, going to another sensitive topic again. It’s like asking Koreans or let’s say, mentioning anything “Japanese” or “Japan” with it (peace out!).

Apparently, Roland Lim’s advice doesn’t only apply for Hong Kong and Singapore wanderers. Maybe if you’re going to a shop that practices for-profit tactics, don’t ever come close to those. I’m warning you, don’t be to kiss-arse this time!

Several experiences with sellers who fool around:

acecardenas said:

I was at HK last June 11-14, 2010. I did a canvass around Tsim Sha Tsui area and found this store selling a very cheap Canon 10-22mm at HKD 3,500. I tested it and it has a flare when shooting it with lights. I tried shooting and shooting until they discourage me to buy canon 10-22 mm. The seller said efs lenses are made in Taiwan. I was not expecting that statement and then he elaborated and recommended the new Sigma 10-24 f3.5. However, the guy seem to know that I am fix with 10-22 so he suggested that he can get the Japan 10-22mm. I waited and tested the lens and it works so well, so good. So I ask him if its the same price. He said Japan is expensive HKD 5,600. So I haggle it down to HKD 5,000. In the end I was upset and did not buy and the guy keeps on shouting at me “p**t** in*”. To make the long story short HKD 3,500 was really a bait and a fake one.

BAD CUSTOMER SERVICE! BAD EXPERIENCE IN HONGKONG!

I hope you don’t mind me posting this.

Good thing nag-walk out ka dude! Gusto ko talaga gawin ‘yan! Promise!

To those who do not know yet, I should have not bought anything in Singapore. Yeah, I’d rather be empty-handed than end up with something I really do not like. HAHA, eh asa ka naman kung may kasama kang sipsip sa mga ganung tao! (Oh no!)

Okay, so what if something is Made in Japan and the EF-S is made in Taiwan? To make the story short, WE DON’T GIVE A FUCK about the country of manufacture. We don’t care at all, and I have tested the Sigma, pero nag-give up lang talaga ako kasi mataas talaga ang standards ko. This is the trait that even demure people won’t ever learn or develop.

Bait and Switch Tactic: So that’s why it’s better to go on a shopping spree in the USA

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It doesn’t only happen in Hong Kong, actually, and in Singapore. In every part of the Sinosphere, this bait-and-switch tactic is almost everywhere. If this happens to you, I advise, you’d rather walk out than end up for something you really don’t like at the first place.

At least, if you’re going to shop in the US, it would be more beneficial since people there are really very frank. Also, there are a lot of Filipinos there so you won’t get out of place (OP). An Austrian deviant *spike83 stated that he’d like to purchase his 5D Mark III in the US because of very high prices in his native country, but his only concern is the warranty (I know right?).

Again, if you’re going to the United States to go on a shopping spree, make sure that the place you’re going is definitely tax-free (please enlighten me American people!).

Wonder why I am telling you that the US is the best place? Okay, here’s the thing. If you’re going to buy in Japan, yes, it is granted that gadgets are cheaper there, however, you’ll only have two language options (English and Nihongo), especially if you’re a Canonican. Canon’s marketing strategy is very regionalistic, so you’d rather opt for the US instead.

Not to generalize the Sinosphere but…


cgena.com|Infomax — best shop ever.


letteshaven.blogspot.com|The cleaner environment of Infomax — LOVE IT!

I’ll make a separate article about Infomax. I really do recommend this shop to those who are not fans or haters of Hidalgo, Quiapo. Nyahahahah!

Why I chose Canon over anything else?

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Maybe people might be wondering why I chose Canon.

There are many reasons why I chose it over Nikon, or Sony, or Olympus. In the case of Sony, I like their Cyber-shot line. For Olympus… I like their waterproof series. In Nikon’s case, maybe their film cameras.

Now that’s what I was thinking of… maybe because:

– Canon’s EF and EF-S lenses are actually designed as if a graphic designer designed it. Notice its appearance and you really wanna treat it as a museum object.
– You don’t need to worry about the autofocus dilemma in Canon — one reason why Canon was the original in terms of the autofocus system.
– Memorizing the terms L DO IS and USM is easy. Okay, for instance, EF, EF-S, TS-E, MP-E –> they’re not hard to memorize at all. Canon has this reputation for being “organized.” Naming of lenses, camera bodies and the like –> they’re labelled in a very organized way, so Canon fans find this convenient.
– Another thing about the Canon EOS camera bodies — they have more beautiful and stylish designs, but never sacrificed build quality and ruggedness.
– Starting year 2009 onwards, focal lengths of lenses are labelled by using the Myriad Pro font (except for the 70-200mm L IS II USM) and cameras that are released starting 2010 are already featured with a 3:2 (720×480) LCD monitor, which is conducive to view your photos as if you’re viewing their native 3:2 aspect ratio. In fact, 3:2 LCD monitors are considered “widescreen.” Semi-pro and entry-level cameras (within the xxD and xxxD range) usually feature this articulate LCD monitor.
– The Canon EOS system is intended for obsessive-compulsive people.
– Regardless of megapixel count, DiG!C quality is really impressive, similar to that of BIONZ + EXMOR combined.
– User-friendliness is another thing. With regards to exposure compensation, Canon’s pointer is the same with Sony and Olympus.
– Nikon did never hit the 18 Megapixel count (actual count is 17.9), but Sony achieved this.
– Canon’s Clear View LCD monitor almost has the same quality with Apple’s Retina Display, which is very much conducive for viewing photographs. I think Nikon failed to provide this, even for the D3000.
– Telephoto lenses are dirty white. Also, they’re stylish.
– Canon EOS bodies are generally lighter despite looking wider and bulkier.
– Their marketing style is “what-you-see-is-what-you-get” in terms of style, and their marketing strategy is at-par with Sony.
– Talking about wider range selection of lenses, I think Canon is the best when it comes to those things.

There are some other things, however, that are not in Canon (or let’s say, needs improvement)

Image Stabilization in-camera: This is a Sony Minolta Alpha feature (Super Steady Shot). Whether everyone likes it or not, it’s OK to buy lenses that feature NO image stabilizer/vibration reduction/vibration compensation/optical stabilizer if you’re asking for a lens for the Sony A-mount.
More superzoom lens options: Nikon has this 18-105mm lens, I really do not know with the rest (you know me, Canon-biased!), but Canon only has the following flexi-lenses: EF-S 18-135mm IS, EF-S 18-135mm STM, EF-S 18-200mm, EF 28-300mm… et cetera. Superzoom lenses are often lacking full-time manual focusing, so that’s why I really do avoid those kind of lenses.
EOS M’s underrated status: I think Canon is not yet ready to market their EOS M system just yet. They’re still starting and they’re focusing on the DSLRs first to find new ways on developing their EOS M series
Biased between the 7D and the 6D: Supposedly, full-frame cameras should have 100% viewfinder coverage. While some of you might wonder why the Canon EOS 6D only has 97% viewfinder coverage, well for me, it’s a true embarrassment. While the 7D has 100% viewfinder coverage, why can’t it also be for the 6D (This case scenario is really much worse than the 5D Mark II’s 98% viewfinder coverage)? After all, the 6D is a FULL-FRAME camera, whether it is a consumer-level one or not. This made me push through the 5D Mark III dream, though.
Japanese version of EOS camera bodies have limited language options: Another embarrassment! This is a very tough job for lazy people, but having only English and Japanese as your only language option is the worst case scenario for those of you planning to buy a DSLR in Yodobashi Camera. I think, most Japanese people will really be very insulted with this one, because it doesn’t have to mean that Japan-targeted products = two-language options only. The only way to solve this problem is to update the firmware, but make sure that the firmware should come from non-Japanese Canon websites. (Okay correction, I think even updating the firmware does not help. There’s something in the camera that is exclusively for a certain region.)
Lens hood for non-L series: This is one of the most sensitive topics ever, I believe. Unlike Sigma, Tokina and other third-party lens manufacturers, Canon only provides lens hoods and other accessories for their L-lenses. I do understand that since they do observe “hassle-free” investments, but for lenses that are not part of the L-series, they do not include a lens hood or a lens pouch. BAH, we need to work our arses off to get that freaking lens hood! One thing why third-party lens manufacturers could actually be venerated — they OFFER lens hoods, included with the lens!
The 1D series deserves more megapixel count than the 5D series: Seriously, who does not want a tall full-frame camera with MOAR megapixels, right? This should also be the same for tall Nikon D’s.
– More EF-S wide angle lenses: I seriously don’t get it why Canon hasn’t released any wide-angle lens with a 12-24mm/11-24mm zoom range. Actually, this is really beneficial to those who are using APS-C cameras. It’s like supporting the fact that APS-C is meant for telephoto, full-frame for wide-angle shizz… which shouldn’t be actually happening.
EF 24-70mm f/2.8L with an IS: This never happened at all. Reverse zoom or not, I don’t care. For as long as there is IS on it, I’ll definitely go for it.
35mm lens with a 58mm filter thread: I hope this might have IS too!
Canon shops (with the Canon logo, ok? Like Apple stores with its signature logo/icon) do not provide the 15-85mm lens: HAHAHA, this is the severe problem, I think Infomax is more prepared after all (yep, my favorite shop! Much better than Hidalgo, swear that!).

Canon isn’t only about photography

Not your typical Digital ELPH/IXY/IXUS, PowerShot or EOS provider, but come to think of it, they also do offer printers, scanners, calculators (hahahah, yeah this is very unusual) and other products. It is the same with Sony (almost, actually since Canon never did offer any mobile phone or laptop, which would appear WEIRD if that really happens), but the difference is, Sony is somewhat the Japanese version of Samsung (yep, from radio, stereo, TV, laptop, mobile phone, camera…) for their versatility and flexibility — and their diversity to offer a lot more for their fans.

Okay, I’m really Canon-biased, but that’s because their marketing strategy and err… manuals and the like are very much like Sony. I think Sony started their Alpha line when it merged with Minolta because they’re the only Japanese company left behind not pioneering their very own DSLR technology. I think, Canon never needed to merge with any other company, same with Nikon. Same with Olympus, Pentax, any company that does not need that strategy. Maybe if I were to go full-frame, I think the 5D Mark III is the only thing I’m waiting for.

I hope that Canon does everything in my second list! There are a lot of things that they should improve, since I told a while ago, that it is for obsessive-compulsive people. Oh, dear. Yep, those things I have mentioned are a huge embarrassment for Canon, and another thing is that, why do they have to put ONLY TWO FREAKING SPRACHEN in their Japanese version?

Canon EOS 60D: The First-Hand Review

After almost two years of photography experience, I finally upgraded to a semi-pro camera body… so please welcome Blooregard, aka, the Canon EOS 60D!

I named it Blooregard. Well, one thing that I want to tell you guys is that, I rarely make names for gadgets, but since it is a “norm” for mainstream popular kids, whoa like… what DAFUQ!?

Before buying the 60D…


Here’s one milk tea experience. But I still think that Pao Pao is still heaven!

Ever since, I thought of upgrading, if not the 5D Mark II. However, because the 5D MkII’s screen is 4:3 in aspect ratio, I chose to wait for the 5D Mark III only for higher megapixels, SD card slot, 100% viewfinder coverage and a ginormous 3:2 3.2″ LCD monitor (which is sadly not articulate).

The 60D is actually a second choice, next to the 5D Mark II. Actually, this made me realize that the 60D is actually a real semi-pro model. Why? I’ll show you everything (haha, check out YouTube.com/MolybdenumStudios soon!).


Here it is! The 60D supplied with its kit lens (plus an 8GB SD card).

Okay, so the 60D with the kit lens. However, I still decided to use the EF-S 15-85mm lens because the 18-135mm will belong to me momma. There were “challenges” actually, rather than meticulous organized… shizz. First of all, the 60D’s manual is in Nippongo! The seller told me that their suppliers are Japanese (hontoni desu ka?). Worse, the serial number is worn out (black background is better than the white one nyahaha!).


This is how the 60D looks like with the kit lens (:

So, here’s the story that I’d like to share with all of you guys…

One thing that I really like to share with you is an advantage when upgrading to a semi-pro model/body: Usually, people using an entry-level model (e.g., xxxD, xxxxD) upgrading to full-frame might have a hard time adjusting. Another thing is, if you’re planning to upgrade to full-frame, remember, EF-S lenses are NOT compatible with full-frame EOS bodies (e.g., 5D series, 1Dx, 1Ds). Instead, you have to invest to an EF lens, specifically the ones that are L-series (EF lenses with a red barrel, for Nikonians, it’s usually the gold barrel).

Another thing is that, third-party lenses are actually very limited in features, which is not exactly true. In fact, there are some lenses that are almost at-par with marque lenses, but marque lenses are still the choice of professional photographers.


Notice that the camera is really much bigger than the Canon EOS 550D/Rebel T2i/Kiss X4

Higher-end camera bodies tend to be heavier and more advanced in features, but the 60D serves as a mediator (or bridge) between the entry-level xxxD bodies and the xxD ones (7D included!). Usually, xxD bodies have CF card slots rather than SD card slots, but the 60D rather has a/n SD card slot, which is more accessible to those who were using xxxD models that start from EOS 450D to the latest. The only xxD features retained on the 60D is the pentaprism viewfinder (don’t get me wrong, I have a very hard time dealing with a pentaprism viewfinder, so I often adjust the grade), different battery pack and… hmmm, I’ll think about it. I’m a first-time xxD user, BTW. (:


With the signature strap! Usually, most DSLRs are equipped with “EOS DIGITAL,” but xxD and xD models are different.

One advantage about the xxD models is that, their strap is an identification whether a person uses an xxxD/xxxxD, xxD and/or an xD model. When you see a strap with a xxD model in it, it means that they’re using mid-range bodies, but if you spot someone with a camera strap with an xD model in it, you’re going to say, “Whoa, this person must be rich,” or “That person must be a professional.” Don’t get me wrong, that doesn’t mean that if you own an xD model, you’re automatically a professional photographer or a well-off person.

You don’t need to be a professional photographer to buy a full-frame camera body, however, is is still considered as a luxury item for some few.

Original quote. LOL.

Usually, full-frame cameras offer something that APS-C sensor bodies cannot even do, and you guessed it, wide-angle capabilities! A full-frame body is ideal for standard telephoto and wide-angle focal lengths since most camera manufacturers tend to be VERY biased in terms of focal length — especially for wide-angle lenses that are not conducive enough for an APS-C sensor.

However, there are some advantages when using a crop sensor body — and that is telephoto capabilities. You could actually use the 60D when using a 70-200mm L lens if you want to stalk your crush (oh no, BI right here!) or maybe capture a very wild animal.

EF-S lenses or short-back focus lenses are considered as “digital lenses” since they only work on digital SLRs with an APS-C sensor, while EF lenses (or non short-back focus lenses) are made for EVERY digital SLR, and also for film cameras. Make sure that the mount matches — you can’t fit Canon lenses on a Nikon or a Sony body unless there’s an adaptor. Right, yowayowa-san?

Since I’m a 60D owner already, I think I am ready to use a telephoto lens! Kidding!


This is the mode dial, together with the switch.

Actually, the 60D and the 5D Mark III have some certain similarities. The photo above shows you everything.

Unfortunately for the 60D, there’s only one C mode (yep, custom mode, but I don’t have a hell of an idea to use this function!). But that’s okay, I don’t even know how to use it. I though that was the “Creative Filter” mode. LOL.

The switch is actually at the TOP LEFT side of the 60D, if the 550D has it on the TOP RIGHT SIDE. Indeed, this is very difficult if you’re used to having that mode dial and switch at your RIGHT side, all thanks to this LCD status panel that appears in orange light, it is actually an “obstacle” for me, but for some pros and serious amateurs out there, it is convenient.


LCD status panel|One is not lit, the other one is lit!

Now how the hell should I use this… LCD status panel? All I know is the ISO thing, and that’s about it. If you’ll notice the EXIF data of some of my photographs, the most frequent ISO would be ISO 100, making sure that the photos are smooth and grain-free, but to achieve the ±0 EV, I think it’s almost impossible to achieve something that is formula-driven by:

ISO 100 –> EV ±0 –> shutter speed + aperture. Usually, everything should be balanced, from aperture to shutter speed, but it should be taken note that EV ±0 is usually the standard when it comes to adjusting the aperture and the shutter speed.

Before, 1/30 would be the default in my standards. But come to think of it, you’re not a true-blooded amateur if you’re going to rely on the default settings. Experiment on a certain basis so that you’ll get the best results.


Articulate LCD screen — this has the same quality with Apple’s retina display, brought to you by Sharp.

It is not a joke that the LCD screen of the 60D is very much crystal clear — similar to that of Apple’s retina display. If you think about obsessing with crystal clarity, the 60D’s LCD monitor is actually much more crystal clear than (that of) the 550D’s.

It is also helpful when you’re going to take photographs of amazing ceiling art (hello, Basilica fresco!).

Sample Photographs

Apologies if I failed to use the RAW mode (Large — high quality). I only used the S-RAW mode, which is SMALL!

How to take a shot using the articulate LCD monitor?

Especially for the “almost-peace sign part,” this was the procedure…


I believe this is the subject. Oh yeah, it’s very difficult to take a shot of a perfect circle of this one unless your LCD monitor’s actually articulate.


Okay, so this is how the articuate LCD monitor looks like… but what about the camera? How does it look like if in this case?


Here’s the set-up! Tee-hee, pardon me for the photo! It seemed that I was not ready to shoot it properly, though!

Anyways, this is it! Shoot like a PRO will come back just in case you want more tutorials! ❤ However, there’s a part II for this post, so stay tuned!

Canon EOS 650D having… chemical dilemma!?


dpreview.com|Uh-oh! Watch out for some… chemicals!

dpreview.com TELLS IT ALL!

Canon has issued a warning to owners of the EOS 650D/Rebel T4i that the rubber hand-grips of some models may turn white, and produce a chemical that can cause an allergic reaction. According to Canon, the chemical, zinc bis (N,N’-dimethyldithiocarbamate), is not used in the production of the camera but is a potential by-product of a chemical reaction between other substances found in the hand-grip. Canon has identified a certain number of cameras where a larger than normal amount of ‘rubber accelerator’ was used in the production of this component, which could potentially cause this chemical reaction.

According to Canon USA, ‘some EOS 650D/Rebel T4i cameras’ manufactured between May 31st and June 15th ‘may be affected’ by this chemical reaction, which causes the hand-grips of the cameras to turn white. Zinc bis, the substance produced by the chemical reaction, may cause an allergic reaction in some people, and ‘as a precautionary measure’ Canon advises owners of affected cameras to ‘thoroughly wash your hands with water if they have come in contact with the rubber grip’.

Reaction/s

Duh! This is not new to me, but the Canon EOS 5D Mark III suffered a certain light leak. Oh noes, do you think this is the end of Canon’s “magic”? I hope NOT!


Wikipedia|Light leaking example

Seriously, like Canon 5D Mark III’s mishap would be, “LOMO-fication”?

I know every technology has its own mishaps, but light leaking on a respected camera model and some chemical reactions on a simple rubber grip for the latest model would only make Canon’s reputation tainted. There’s nothing really good in making one mishap to make your loyal fans burn their money for your “profit.”

Japanese Inconsistency (not again! Whoopsie!)

If you think that Japan is perfection to all of you, I might prove you wrong. Look what happened to Tekken, after Namco made some excuses and inconsistencies. Look what happened after Itagaki Tomonobu was kicked out because of scandals (please include the time when he did not embrace the PS3 for his games… all he wants is the Xbox!). Also, please include the Toyota thing (anyways, Toyota is still one of the best brands, undeniably true — it learns from its mistakes). I’m afraid, Canon is next in line with all these “mishaps.” Look where is the 24-70mm L lens Mark II and the 1Dx? Delayed after their announcement dates! Now I know why after Koizumi’s rule as Japanese PM, his successors could no longer stand it and simply resigned immediately — like what I have written before, the Japanese pioneered the art of balancing. However, their consistency is questionable. Companies would rather become nalipasan because they lost their magic. Olympus, Sony… and the old ones (Aiwa, anyone?), they’re no longer existing.

However, I still love the Land of the Rising Sun, though! At least for them, they believe that there’s always room for improvement.

Believe it or not — Offshoring isn’t good!

When Sony, Canon, Olympus… and other Japanese firms were not yet offshoring to China, the magic was there. They were the top giant gadget companies during their time, but when they offshore to China, there were inconsistencies that happened.

Labor costs in Japan are damn costly, and that’s undeniably true, as a matter of fact. Yet when thinking about manufacturing goods in a country with a very high labor cost, you’ll safely say that their products are really GOOD. Leica, Zeiss… and any German firms — every technology that is Made in Germany usually gets the highest form of respect; it earns a very good reputation for its durability. Scandinavian companies such as Phase One, Hasselblad and the like have a reputation that could par with German technology — no wonder cost of living in Europe (European Union included!) is very high, unless you’re going East.

Offshoring may be helpful and beneficial, but it certainly isn’t proper at all. Imagine your Apple products are really produced and assembled in the United States — see? You’re really going to smile when I say this, but please take note that the Mac computer’s prices, however in that case, might have the same price with a single vehicle. I’m not kidding on this, if a typical MacBook Pro costs USD 1,000+, it might rise to USD 2,000+ or worse, USD 5,000. In that case, iPods might cost like USD 800+. I ain’t an economics expert, but usually, manufacturers do not set the price. It is either the government or the seller who will dictate the price, whether they would implement tax on it or not.

If you’re going to ask why offshoring exists, and occurs, is because of labor cost issues. It would have been better if Filipino mobile phone companies would set up factories in the Philippines, but they had no choice but to offshore it in China, which is bad news to everyone. If only governments support technologies in the Philippines, then better! Maybe Cherry Mobile, myPhone and Torque would not only be regional but global! That would be good news if that happens.

China may be a place for offshoring, but please take note that there’s Thailand, Vietnam and the Philippines as other countries to set up those factories. At least their quality is better (no biases intended) and of course… quality-oriented. After all, offshoring might not be a bad word at all!

Canon’s offshore to Taiwan

Taiwan is like the “Japan” of the Sinosphere (please, don’t take this against me!) — Asus, Acer are going global, too! However, despite controversies surrounding Japan-Taiwan relations (oh, discrimination against Japanese in Taiwan, and discrimination against Taiwanese in Japan, as Takeshi Kaneshiro and Sadaharu Oh!), you can’t blame what ever happened to history! Taiwan was occupied by Japan before… so maybe there are haunted memories still staining Taiwan… but please take note of Amuro Namie’s visit there!

I believe Canon insisted to move part of its factories to Taiwan to continue the making of some lenses and cameras there… and the first camera to be manufactured in Taiwan is no other than the Canon EOS 1100D. The Canon EOS 650D is manufactured there, yet this “chemical dilemma” should not be blamed to a certain country of manufacture. That isn’t right! I believe Canon is doing something dubious to create another issue and make excuses — again!

You can’t blame Canon for its entrance to err… ending up like the other companies I’ve mentioned. I hope it doesn’t end up that way, though.

Some of the shots I took from the 60D… and biases

BTW… when I first tested the 60D, I felt I wanna have it as in RIGHT NOW. But that could actually wait because I feel worried about…

…well you know why there’s a hiatus.

Okay, so I am really excited to review the 60D once it was owned by me. I’ll say, “Hurrah! I got the 60D and I’ll make the most of it!”

Getting an upgrade? No problem!

Not a fan of a DSLR’s features (e.g., optimizer) but I think taking photographs is more fun, though. (; The 60D I used isn’t mine, I only tested it and it’s really good in terms of quality. At-par with the 550D, of course, it is expected, but it’s much more challenging to operate. So once more, I will adjust.

Taking bokeh background shots or maybe clearer view of photographs should not make you a “pro.” It’s not easy to be a “pro” because you’ll earn by your own, but if you’re wishing to upgrade to another body, I think you don’t need to make photography as a “profession.” After all, who cares about your full-frame body?

You don’t need to be a pro to buy a full-frame, however it is considered as a luxury item, so no wonder people using those are mostly professionals, but professionals proved that camera bodies do not matter at all, since they consider their budget more than their taste. This is true if you’re really passionate about your field — you don’t need any high-end bodies to be called [as] a “pro.”

Now I really have this first-hand account of someone using a 5D Mark II with an L lens — and that person I think is a student. Dunno if she’s a pro but if you’d notice, if someone OWNS a 5D, you would assume, “Jeez, I think he/she must be professional.” It would be legit if you refer to zemotion as a pro. Another thing, the late Francis M owned a 5D Mark II as well, and I really do not know if he made a career out of it– but forget it.

Canon-biased here!

I really do not know if you’re a Canon user switching to Nikon (oh no, don’t get me started with that! I’m forever a Canon user and will always be!) or a Nikon user switching to Canon (hello welcome to the family!). I’m really Canon-biased, so you can’t question the fact that I’d rather stay Canon forever since I have read a certain source that Nikkor lenses seemed costlier than the body (is there such thing? @_@). Also, if you’re a Nikon user, you need to match your lens with the camera, especially if your camera has no AF motor err… source? Unlike Canon, you won’t ever have compatibility problems especially if you use the xxxxD, xxxD, xxD and the 7D. If you’re likely to hit the full-frame community, don’t invest for an EF-S. Rather aim for the EF — hahaha! Caught y’all!

Also, I chose Canon because of its vibrant feel. Like, the vibrancy is present when you view a Canon photo, and the images have a more pleasant look and feel (Okay, I’m not biased this time). Canon users tend to have less stress when it comes to lenses and their marketing strategy (via brochures) are like, tinototoo. In English, their marketing strategy reminds me of Sony’s — the way they market their products is not like Olympus (which is more of a magnifier). They make the products palatable and also, their descriptions are more detailed– walang kulang sa mga features, as in they do their best to convince people.

Another thing is, Canon’s user interface is easier and faster to learn (I’ll make a video about this ok?). You won’t ever scratch your head while operating the camera itself.

Believe it or not, like what I said, it should simply not depend upon the photographer alone, but it should be from his/her personal taste — lenses, techniques and the like, there are no certain rules that should dictate to create a good photograph. Personal preferences should always be the top priority, from taste to budget… it’s in yours.

I don’t hate Nikon, actually. If I’m Canon-biased, that should not equate I myself, a “Canonican,” should say NO to Nikon. It’s only that Canon is easier to operate IMO. Hehehe.