Canon EOS 60D: The First-Hand Review

After almost two years of photography experience, I finally upgraded to a semi-pro camera body… so please welcome Blooregard, aka, the Canon EOS 60D!

I named it Blooregard. Well, one thing that I want to tell you guys is that, I rarely make names for gadgets, but since it is a “norm” for mainstream popular kids, whoa like… what DAFUQ!?

Before buying the 60D…


Here’s one milk tea experience. But I still think that Pao Pao is still heaven!

Ever since, I thought of upgrading, if not the 5D Mark II. However, because the 5D MkII’s screen is 4:3 in aspect ratio, I chose to wait for the 5D Mark III only for higher megapixels, SD card slot, 100% viewfinder coverage and a ginormous 3:2 3.2″ LCD monitor (which is sadly not articulate).

The 60D is actually a second choice, next to the 5D Mark II. Actually, this made me realize that the 60D is actually a real semi-pro model. Why? I’ll show you everything (haha, check out YouTube.com/MolybdenumStudios soon!).


Here it is! The 60D supplied with its kit lens (plus an 8GB SD card).

Okay, so the 60D with the kit lens. However, I still decided to use the EF-S 15-85mm lens because the 18-135mm will belong to me momma. There were “challenges” actually, rather than meticulous organized… shizz. First of all, the 60D’s manual is in Nippongo! The seller told me that their suppliers are Japanese (hontoni desu ka?). Worse, the serial number is worn out (black background is better than the white one nyahaha!).


This is how the 60D looks like with the kit lens (:

So, here’s the story that I’d like to share with all of you guys…

One thing that I really like to share with you is an advantage when upgrading to a semi-pro model/body: Usually, people using an entry-level model (e.g., xxxD, xxxxD) upgrading to full-frame might have a hard time adjusting. Another thing is, if you’re planning to upgrade to full-frame, remember, EF-S lenses are NOT compatible with full-frame EOS bodies (e.g., 5D series, 1Dx, 1Ds). Instead, you have to invest to an EF lens, specifically the ones that are L-series (EF lenses with a red barrel, for Nikonians, it’s usually the gold barrel).

Another thing is that, third-party lenses are actually very limited in features, which is not exactly true. In fact, there are some lenses that are almost at-par with marque lenses, but marque lenses are still the choice of professional photographers.


Notice that the camera is really much bigger than the Canon EOS 550D/Rebel T2i/Kiss X4

Higher-end camera bodies tend to be heavier and more advanced in features, but the 60D serves as a mediator (or bridge) between the entry-level xxxD bodies and the xxD ones (7D included!). Usually, xxD bodies have CF card slots rather than SD card slots, but the 60D rather has a/n SD card slot, which is more accessible to those who were using xxxD models that start from EOS 450D to the latest. The only xxD features retained on the 60D is the pentaprism viewfinder (don’t get me wrong, I have a very hard time dealing with a pentaprism viewfinder, so I often adjust the grade), different battery pack and… hmmm, I’ll think about it. I’m a first-time xxD user, BTW. (:


With the signature strap! Usually, most DSLRs are equipped with “EOS DIGITAL,” but xxD and xD models are different.

One advantage about the xxD models is that, their strap is an identification whether a person uses an xxxD/xxxxD, xxD and/or an xD model. When you see a strap with a xxD model in it, it means that they’re using mid-range bodies, but if you spot someone with a camera strap with an xD model in it, you’re going to say, “Whoa, this person must be rich,” or “That person must be a professional.” Don’t get me wrong, that doesn’t mean that if you own an xD model, you’re automatically a professional photographer or a well-off person.

You don’t need to be a professional photographer to buy a full-frame camera body, however, is is still considered as a luxury item for some few.

Original quote. LOL.

Usually, full-frame cameras offer something that APS-C sensor bodies cannot even do, and you guessed it, wide-angle capabilities! A full-frame body is ideal for standard telephoto and wide-angle focal lengths since most camera manufacturers tend to be VERY biased in terms of focal length — especially for wide-angle lenses that are not conducive enough for an APS-C sensor.

However, there are some advantages when using a crop sensor body — and that is telephoto capabilities. You could actually use the 60D when using a 70-200mm L lens if you want to stalk your crush (oh no, BI right here!) or maybe capture a very wild animal.

EF-S lenses or short-back focus lenses are considered as “digital lenses” since they only work on digital SLRs with an APS-C sensor, while EF lenses (or non short-back focus lenses) are made for EVERY digital SLR, and also for film cameras. Make sure that the mount matches — you can’t fit Canon lenses on a Nikon or a Sony body unless there’s an adaptor. Right, yowayowa-san?

Since I’m a 60D owner already, I think I am ready to use a telephoto lens! Kidding!


This is the mode dial, together with the switch.

Actually, the 60D and the 5D Mark III have some certain similarities. The photo above shows you everything.

Unfortunately for the 60D, there’s only one C mode (yep, custom mode, but I don’t have a hell of an idea to use this function!). But that’s okay, I don’t even know how to use it. I though that was the “Creative Filter” mode. LOL.

The switch is actually at the TOP LEFT side of the 60D, if the 550D has it on the TOP RIGHT SIDE. Indeed, this is very difficult if you’re used to having that mode dial and switch at your RIGHT side, all thanks to this LCD status panel that appears in orange light, it is actually an “obstacle” for me, but for some pros and serious amateurs out there, it is convenient.


LCD status panel|One is not lit, the other one is lit!

Now how the hell should I use this… LCD status panel? All I know is the ISO thing, and that’s about it. If you’ll notice the EXIF data of some of my photographs, the most frequent ISO would be ISO 100, making sure that the photos are smooth and grain-free, but to achieve the ±0 EV, I think it’s almost impossible to achieve something that is formula-driven by:

ISO 100 –> EV ±0 –> shutter speed + aperture. Usually, everything should be balanced, from aperture to shutter speed, but it should be taken note that EV ±0 is usually the standard when it comes to adjusting the aperture and the shutter speed.

Before, 1/30 would be the default in my standards. But come to think of it, you’re not a true-blooded amateur if you’re going to rely on the default settings. Experiment on a certain basis so that you’ll get the best results.


Articulate LCD screen — this has the same quality with Apple’s retina display, brought to you by Sharp.

It is not a joke that the LCD screen of the 60D is very much crystal clear — similar to that of Apple’s retina display. If you think about obsessing with crystal clarity, the 60D’s LCD monitor is actually much more crystal clear than (that of) the 550D’s.

It is also helpful when you’re going to take photographs of amazing ceiling art (hello, Basilica fresco!).

Sample Photographs

Apologies if I failed to use the RAW mode (Large — high quality). I only used the S-RAW mode, which is SMALL!

How to take a shot using the articulate LCD monitor?

Especially for the “almost-peace sign part,” this was the procedure…


I believe this is the subject. Oh yeah, it’s very difficult to take a shot of a perfect circle of this one unless your LCD monitor’s actually articulate.


Okay, so this is how the articuate LCD monitor looks like… but what about the camera? How does it look like if in this case?


Here’s the set-up! Tee-hee, pardon me for the photo! It seemed that I was not ready to shoot it properly, though!

Anyways, this is it! Shoot like a PRO will come back just in case you want more tutorials!❤ However, there’s a part II for this post, so stay tuned!

About Molybdenum Studios

I am a very opinionated person. Get used to it. If you can't stand it, then so be it.

Posted on October 8, 2012, in Digital SLR Cameras, Everything Technological, Online Tutorials, Photography and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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